It’s no secret that eggs, full of protein, vitamins, and minerals (enough to grow a baby chicken from just one cell) are one of the most nutritious foods on the planet.  Worldwide an average person consumes about 150 to 200 eggs annually.  That’s over a trillion eggs per year!  Now ask yourself this: “What happens to all of those eggshells?”

The shell of a chicken egg is comprised of about 96% calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals which are bound together by proteins.  Common commercial methods for disposing of eggshells include use as fertilizer or as a source of calcium in animal feed, but the average consumer typically drops them into the kitchen waste bin or down the garbage disposal.  If you are among this group, please read on to discover six creative uses for eggshells that will benefit your garden.

Eggshells are a great way to add calcium to your compost.  Because shells have a very high surface area to volume ratio, they decompose very quickly.  Don’t even worry about sterilizing or grinding them up.  Just toss your shells on the pile or into the barrel and turn them under.

Alternately, you can incorporate crumbled eggshell directly into the bottoms of your planting holes in the spring.

During the winter months, distribute your shells over the plot of land where you will plant come springtime.  Once the ground warms up, you can till the shells into the soil.  If you are adverse to the idea of having eggshells on the ground all winter, you can also clean and store the shells until planting season rolls around.

While calcium is considered a secondary nutrient for plants, your garden will certainly appreciate the added minerals, especially if you grow tomatoes or peppers as these plants are the most easily affected by calcium-deficiency.

You can eat eggs fried, scrambled, as omelets, boiled, poached…If you are wondering what to do with crushed eggshells (or whole eggshells for that matter), keep reading.

Maybe you didn’t know that eggs shells can be used for something else other than throwing away. As an alternative put the shells in the garden. Eggshells provide a boost of calcium to the soil to be soaked up by your plants as well as helping level off your soil pH. They also help fend off blossom end rot in tomatoes and other nightshade fruits.

Egg shells can also be used in the garden to help fight off pests like slugs, snails, cutworms and other crawling pests. Crushed eggshells work much like diatomaceous earth on these pests. When crawling pests cross over an area in the garden where crushed eggshells have been spread, the eggshells make several small cuts in the pests.

Because egg shells quickly biodegrade when introduced into the soil in the garden, they also double as the perfect seed-starter pots. If you are feeding birds in your yard, crush up the eggshells and add them to a dish near the feeder. Female birds, particularly those who are getting ready to lay eggs or recently finished laying, require extra calcium and will definitely appreciate it!

You can use eggless not only for practical usage in the garden but also for being pretty. If your family is egg lover, then you can collect a lot of eggshells, break them into similar sized pieces and dash them on the soil in your garden.

With these tips under your belt, now both you and your garden can enjoy the health benefits of nature’s perfect food – the egg.

 

 

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It’s no secret that eggs, full of protein, vitamins, and minerals (enough to grow a baby chicken from just one cell) are one of the most nutritious foods on the planet.  Worldwide an average person consumes about 150 to 200 eggs annually.  That’s over a trillion eggs per year! ...